Address List Segregation or the “Hoster Edition” of Exchange Server 2010 SP1 – don’t even think about it!

Posted by Jaap Wesselius in Exchange, Exchange 2007, Exchange 2010, Exchange Shell, IT Professional, PowerShell, SysAdmin, Windows PowerShell on 20-09-2010

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All users in your Exchange organization are automatically listed in the Global Address List. When you have multiple departments, or maybe multiple companies (so

metime also referred to as organizations, but this has nothing to do with the Exchange organization) in your Exchange organization you may want to organize or split up the Address List.

Importing the Remote PSTs into Exchange 2010

Posted by James Allison in email, Exchange, Exchange 2010, IT Professional, Outlook, PowerShell, PST Files, PST Importer, PST Importing, SysAdmin, Tutorials, Windows PowerShell on 07-09-2010

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In the previous part of this guide we looked at gaining a list of PST files and machines. In this, the final part of this series, we will look at how to import these into Exchange 2010.

Finding PST Files on the Network – The Manual Way

Posted by James Allison in email, Exchange, Exchange 2010, IT Professional, Outlook, PowerShell, PST Files, PST Importer, PST Importing, SysAdmin, Tutorials, Windows PowerShell on 31-08-2010

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In the last part of this guide the process for importing a local PST file into exchange server was shown. However, in reality it is likely that these PST files are scattered liberally around your network on the hard drives of your users machines as a result of Outlooks personal archiving. Ideally – so that this process is transparent to your users, you’d like some way of finding all these PST files – pairing them up with their users, and importing them into the appropriate mailbox. Here I show you how.

Finding Stale Accounts in AD with Windows PowerShell

Posted by Ben Lye in Active Directory, PowerShell, Windows PowerShell on 16-02-2010

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In an Active Directory domain running at the Windows Server 2003 or higher functional level the lastLogonTimestamp attribute can be used to find out if a user or computer has logged on to the domain recently. This can

be useful information for finding inactive user and computer accounts so that they can be removed from AD.